Empowering women and girls to improve nutrition: building a sisterhood of success

Empowering women and girls to improve nutrition: building a sisterhood of success

As evidence has long suggested, gender inequality can be a cause as well as an effect of hunger and malnutrition. Not surprisingly, higher levels of gender discrimination are associated with higher levels of both acute and chronic undernutrition.
 
Gender and nutrition are not stand-alone issues with some experts considering women to be the nexus of the agriculture, health and nutrition sectors. Studies have shown that when women’s incomes rise they tend to invest more in the nutrition, education, and health of their family, causing a ripple effect that can benefit entire communities - higher female earnings and bargaining power translate into greater investment in children’s education, health and nutrition, which leads to economic growth in the long term.
 
In this paper, authors from five SUN Countries, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Tajikistan, Malawi and Zimbabwe, have contributed case studies of their experiences of gender responsive nutrition actions. These articles present activities and approaches so that other SUN members can be inspired to address immediate nutrition needs while progressing women’s social and economic empowerment. 
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