A toolkit for integrating disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation into ecosystem management of coastal and marine areas in south Asia

A toolkit for integrating disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation into ecosystem management of coastal and marine areas in south Asia

Toolkit for integrating disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation and ecosystem management in south Asia

This comprehensive toolkit, jointly produced by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) India and the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) Asia Pacific Secretariat, seeks to provide strategies for integrating disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) into ecosystem management of coastal and marine areas in south Asia. A thorough background is presented of the challenges faced (both risks and vulnerabilities) and their bearing on the resilience of various coastal environments.

A snapshot of the physical features and various socio-economic sectors of the region is included, before the knowledge needs of coastal managers are discussed. Strategies for conducting hazard vulnerability and risk assessments, mitigation planning and evaluation follow, together with information on knowledge resources, sharing and dissemination. Finally, there is information on institutional and capacity strengthening, improving coordination and the importance of being aware the linkages between DRR, CCA and ecosystem management.

The toolkit concludes by outlining the various ways in which the issues discussed are likely to impact the Millennium Development Goals (MDG).

  • Impact of natural disasters: disrupts or potentially reverses achievements in all eight of the MDGs – the scale of cost increases lead to poverty and food insecurity, hindering MDG 1; causes damage to infrastructure (including schools, MDG 2); and has a disproportionate affect on the poor, women and children, impacting equality, child mortality and maternal health (MDGs 3, 4 and 5). Disasters can also lead to an increased spread of disease (MDG 6), negatively impact ecosystems (MDG 7) and set-back years of development work (MDG 8).
  • Impact of climate change: many of the same issues apply to the MDGs as to the impact of natural disasters due to disproportionate effects on women and the poor. Diseases, such as malaria, are likely to spread and food security will decrease, as will access to health, water, shelter and sanitation.
  • Impacts of biodiversity loss: a continuation of 'business-as-usual' is predicted to severely impact coral reefs, lead to increased loss of biodiversity and spread of diseases and invasive species, resulting in huge economic costs (estimated between US$1.35 to 3.1 trillion per annum) through loss of forests. Such factors contribute negatively to all of the MDGs.
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