Nutrition security of women and children in India: opportunity for building partnership with Low Income Countries (LIC)

Nutrition security of women and children in India: opportunity for building partnership with Low Income Countries (LIC)

Malnutrition is often incorrectly perceived merely as a food problem. Under nutrition, hunger and food insecurity are not the same thing. Malnutrition is a complex multi-determinant problem. Malnutrition is a result of impact of immediate causes of malnutrition - diet and infection. This report focuses on nutrition security of women and children in India, lessons learned challenges ahead and opportunities for building partnerships with Low Income Countries.

India is not a member of the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) movement. However, like most other developing countries, India is focusing on scaling up the essential direct high impact nutrition interventions which is part of global SUN movement and WHA focus. India has experience in implementing most of the direct nutrition interventions. There is a need to intensify support to LIC countries for creating an enabling environment to generate higher interest, investment, commitment towards ensuring the planned outcomes are achieved at a much higher AARR.

India‘s experience in implementing nutrition influencing interventions is comparatively limited. The country,
however, has the experience of launching a number of programmes which has indirect impact or provide a platform to scale up nutrition direct interventions. These include the following programmes – social safety net programs such as the Public Distribution System (PDS) and Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MNRGEGA), poverty alleviation programme such as the National Livelihood Programmes, Conditional Cash Transfer schemes such as the Janani Shishu Suraksha Yojna/Indira Gandhi Matritva Surkshana Yojana (JSSY/IGMSY) and Agriculture extension programmes such as the Krishi Vigyan Kendras
(KVKs) and Total Sanitation Campaign(TSC). In this context, India‘s experience in implementing each of
these sector programmes is immense and would be of value to LICs in reaching out to a wide range of nutrition influencing sectors.

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