The impact of remittances on education in Jordan, Syria and Lebanon

The impact of remittances on education in Jordan, Syria and Lebanon

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is witnessing the migration of its most educated labour that is seeking higher returns to compensate their households' initial investment in education. This paper uses micro data from three households’ surveys conducted in three neighbouring countries in the Eastern Mediterranean (Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon) to study the impact of migrant remittances on education attendance and attainment.

The paper clarifies that Jordan, Syria and Lebanon are among the highest recipients of remittances in the world in proportion to their GDPs. The document relies on a model that depicts the relationship between migration and remittances from one end and human capital formation represented through education from the other.

The results show that migrant remittance receipt has a positive effect on education attendance. More specifically, the results show that the magnitude of the remittance impact on both education outcomes (education attendance and education attainment) is larger for men compared to that of women in Jordan and Syria, but lower in Lebanon.

Subsequently, the authors conclude that in some countries around the region gender dimensions are still important in the household’s investment decisions in the sibling’s human capital.