Effectiveness of communication strategies embedded in social marketing programmes on health behaviours and related health and welfare outcomes in LMICs

Effectiveness of communication strategies embedded in social marketing programmes on health behaviours and related health and welfare outcomes in LMICs

Health related communication strategies have changed significantly in the last 15 years from top down public service announcements to a wider approach which draws on behaviour models and methods used in marketing and adapted for the purposes of "social marketing". Behaviour change communication (BCC) is a more recent approach, which makes strategic use of communication to promote positive health outcomes. It is based on proven theories and models of behaviour change (and maintenance) and market segmentation.

However the evidence on the effectiveness of social marketing and/or behaviour change communication strategies in the health and public health context is not always well synthesised, and often scattered across a number of subsectors in water and sanitation, family planning, mother and child health, malaria, and epidemic diseases such as HIV, polio, and avian influenza. The effectiveness of the communication strategies reported can also be confounded by issues related to health product or service characteristics such as price, access, and ease of use.

This review will assess the evidence on “what works” and the impact of BCC strategies in a social marketing environment on health behaviour and other health and welfare outcomes among individuals and their carers and communities. The review will draw on a wide range of public health programmes implemented in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

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