In-service training policy in Korea

In-service training policy in Korea

As the importance of training In-Service workers was emphasized in the late 1980s, the standard for imposing the training obligation was changed from the number of employees to the total payroll. However, In-Service worker training did not get much attention before the Asian financial crisis struck in the late 1990s. The vocational skills development project for In-Service workers was activated in earnest in 1995 when the obligatory in-plant vocational training system was abolished and integrated into the employment insurance system. In other words, Korea finally introduced a system that obligated all enterprises to pay training levies as part of employment insurance premiums and gives such training levies back to those that provide training to cover their training costs. The vocational skills development project for In-Service workers was greatly reinforced by adopting this incentive-based funding approach and accommodating demands from employers who were the main providers of financial resources. The procedures for recognizing training institutions were eased as well, which allowed various professional education and training institutions to actively participate and offer training courses for In-Service workers, and thus further promoted the project.

This study was conducted as part of the Knowledge Sharing Program to systematically compile and modularize Korea’s development experience, and its aim is to offer basic materials that can be used to develop various consulting and education programs to transfer Korea’s outstanding development experience to developing countries. The study focuses on specific policies and programs, such as the employer-directed training program, the SME training consortium project and the employee-directed training program, so that developing countries can learn lessons from Korea’s experience in implementing the vocational skills development project for In-Service workers and use them in their policy processes.

 

  1. How good is this research?

    Assessing the quality of research can be a tricky business. This blog from our editor offers some tools and tips.