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Organisation

Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University

CRISE is a Development Research Centre within Oxford University supported by the Department for International Development (DFID).

The overall aim of CRISE is to investigate relationships between ethnicity, inequality and conflict, with the aim of identifying economic, political, social and cultural policies which promote stable and inclusive multiethnic societies.

CRISE is made up of a central CRISE HQ based at Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford, and Partner Institutions across the world; staff at HQ and the PIs work in close collaboration on an agreed research programme. The Centre is also developing collaborative links with other experts, commissioning working papers on selected topics to support the programme.

Published Documents

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 Analysing violent conflict in Indonesia: a focus on horizontal inequality
L. Mancini / Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University 2005
Between-group or horizontal inequalities (HIs) have received little attention in the lively empirical literature on civil conflict. To an extent, this is not surprising given the daunting task of measuring distances between groups who...
Fiscal equity: how to reduce horizontal inequality through taxation and spending
F. Stewart; G. Brown; A. Cobham / Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University 2009
While horizontal inequality, or inequality between groups of people, is increasingly recognised as an impediment to long-term poverty reduction in multi-ethnic societies, there is less clarity still on which policy instruments are mos...
To what extent are former combatants in Sierra Leone reintegrated into society?
J. Boersch-Supan / Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University 2009
Six years after the end of the civil war, integrating ex-combatants into civilian society is still a challenge confronting Sierra Leone. Integration is a multidimensional process, commonly broken down into economic, political, and soc...
How do post-conflict countries differ?
G. Brown; A. Langer; F. Stewart / Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University 2008
Despite the apparent decline in the global incidence of major armed conflict, there remain many countries in conflict and many others that are struggling with the legacy of recent violence. These are frequently poorer, less developed ...
Unequal Citizens? Exploring inequalities between Muslims and non-Muslims around the world
F. Stewart / Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University 2008
Although studies on inequality increasingly take into account the inequalities that exist between groups, there has been little analysis so far of these kinds of inequalities – also known as horizontal inequalities (HIs) - at th...
Decentralisation can assist in conflict mitigation
R. Diprose; U. Ukiwo / Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University 2008
This paper examines how the history of grievances, demands, and identity has played out in the context of decentralisation in Nigeria and Indonesia. Focusing on the localities of Poso, Donggala, Sulawesi, Warri, and Calabar, it also l...
Findings which contradict the greed hypothesis for conflict in Nigeria
Y. Guichaoua / Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University 2006
This paper explores the evolution of a Nigerian Yoruba ethnic militia, the Oodua People’s Congress (OPC) and provides an analysis of the rebellion-making decisions in which the state plays an active role. The study finds t...
Does decentralisation alleviate or create ethnic conflict in Indonesia?
R. Diprose / Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University 2007
This paper explores the linkages between decentralisation, conflict and power in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. It argues that decenralisation in Indonesia has to some extent addressed existing grievances in the regions, but that s...
How can horizontal inequalities be reduced?
A. Langer; A. R. Mustapha; F. Stewart / Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University 2007
This paper analyses the nature and extent of prevailing Horizontal Inequalities (HIs). The research particularly focuses on what can be done to reduce actual and perceived HIs in three West African countries, Nigeria, Ghana and C&ocir...
How can aid help to prevent ethnic conflict?
Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity, CRISE, Oxford University 2007
This policy brief explores how aid can be used to prevent conflict by contributing to a fair distribution of resources across different groups in society.  It explains why inequalities between groups, or ‘horizontal in...
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