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Rising Powers such as Brazil, India, China, and South Africa, once predominantly regarded as aid recipient countries, are now becoming more active as donors in their own right, raising important issues for debates on the future of international development cooperation.

Some of the Rising Powers have developed innovative strategies which have achieved considerable social development gains in their home countries, leading researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers to analyse ways of learning from their experiences and applying these lessons elsewhere, particularly in Africa. In addition to exchanges supported by traditional bilateral and multilateral donors, these countries are increasingly active in sharing their experiences directly through ‘South-South Cooperation’.

This guide looks at research outputs in key thematic areas covering the role of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) and other ‘emerging’ or ‘Rising Powers’ in international development, and their impact on poverty reduction and social development in low-income countries.
The International Research Initiative on Brazil and Africa
What can African countries learn from Brazil’s inclusive growth and development? The International Research Initiative on Brazil and Africa (IRIBA), based at the University of Manchester in the UK, brings together an international team of researchers who are examining how lessons from Brazil's development experience can be learned and adapted for African countries. Their outputs pull together a discussion on whether there is a Brazilian model of development.

More from IRIBA...

Rising Powers in International Development: an annotated bibliography
The Rising Powers – a category that includes the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) as well as other key countries such as Mexico, Turkey and Indonesia – are establishing themselves as an influential presence in the global development landscape. This bibliography builds on the work of the ‘BRICS Initiative’, a horizon-scanning project supported by the UK's Institute of Development Studies' Tomorrow Today fund, and the DFID-funded Rising Powers in International Development (RPID) programme.

Latest Documents

Understanding the Rising Powers' contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals
J. Constantine; M. Pontual / Institute of Development Studies UK, 2015
Rising powers such as Brazil, India and China have been criticised for being obstructive in the negotiations on the post-2015 development agenda. The start of the United Nations (UN) negotiations saw high expectations for the role of ...
The use of ICTs to express public outrage in Nigeria over child marriage
J Dada / Global Information Society Watch, 2013
Is public opposition to child marriage in Nigeria increasing? Despite the Nigerian Senate passing a law criminalising child marriage in 2003, only 24 of the 36 states have adopted the law. This concise paper, written by Joh...
Pathways of women's empowerment: building constituencies
Pathways of Women's Empowerment false / Pathways of Women's Empowerment RPC, 2015
This thematic portal examines how women engage with policy change, and the building of alliances and coalitions, to bring about accountability. It also contains information on how to create demand for, and dismantle obstacles to, wome...
Should Southeast Asia fear the Chinese juggernaut? The view from the Philippines
J.T. Yap / Philippine Institute for Development Studies, 2006
China's emergence as an economic giant in the past 25 years has dramatically changed the global economic landscape especially in East Asia. Should this be a cause of fear for these Asian economies? Or a source of opportunities? This P...
India’s growing dependence on imports in the area of bulk drugss
Research and Information System for Developing Countries, 2015
In the background of concerns being voiced by pharmaceutical industry and academics as well as policymakers, RIS organised a Colloquium on India’s Growing Dependence on Imports in the Area of Bulk Drugs in New Delhi on 23 Decemb...