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Searching with a thematic focus on Health, Health and nutrition in India

Showing 11-20 of 63 results

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  • Document

    Nutritional profile of Indian vegetarian diets – the Indian Migration Study (IMS)

    Public Health Foundation of India, 2014
    In response to the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a reduced intake of fat, sugar and salt, and a higher intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and nuts, while maintaining energy balance and healthy weight.
  • Document

    Iron status of pregnant Indian women from an area of active iron supplementation

    Public Health Foundation of India, 2013
    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) 41.8% of pregnant women worldwide have anemia and about half of these women have iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). IDA continues to be a major public health challenge globally and is one of the most common nutritional disorders in pregnant women as iron requirements increase to meet the higher maternal–foetal demands.
  • Document

    Averting obesity and type 2 diabetes in India through sugar-sweetened beverage taxation: an economic-epidemiologic modeling study

    Public Health Foundation of India, 2014
    Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is established as a major risk factor for overweight and obesity, as well as an array of cardio-metabolic conditions, especially type 2 diabetes.
  • Document

    Best practices in integrated child development services: some lesson for its restructuring and strengthening

    Public Health Foundation of India, 2011
    The Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS), India’s primary response to address malnutrition, is one of the world’s largest outreach child development programmes. Within the ICDS, some innovations have demonstrated significant improvements in the nutritional status of children.
  • Document

    International success stories in reducing undernutrition: strategic choices, policy actions and lessons

    Public Health Foundation of India, 2011
    The overall burden of stunting in developing countries is estimated to have reduced from 40 per cent to 29 per cent. Reductions in undernutrition have not always demonstrated a direct relationship with economic development and progress of various countries indicates that there is no one solution to improving nutrition.
  • Document

    Pro-nutrition agriculture in India: entry points and policy options

    Public Health Foundation of India, 2011
    Nutrition security has acquired a sense of urgency in the wake of dramatic surge in food prices since 2005, the ensuing economic crisis and the stubbornly high food inflation rates. These concerns dovetail with the recent renewed emphasis on pro-poor agricultural policies aimed at improving food production and marketing systems and policy measures to augment access to food for the poor.
  • Document

    Role of health systems in improving childhood nutrition in India

    Public Health Foundation of India, 2011
    The status of child undernutrition in India continues as an area of concern. Persistent high levels of undernutrition among women and children and its sluggish decline reflects the dichotomy in India’s growth story.
  • Document

    Overcoming the challenges or urban food and nutrition security

    Public Health Foundation of India, 2011
    Indian economy is the world’s eleventh largest economy by nominal Gross Domestic Product (GDP). However, more that 230 million people remain undernourished. In this regard urban areas present their own challenges and despite their high contribution to the GDP, urban poverty and nutrition security remains a challenge.
  • Document

    Addressing the unequal burden of malnutrition

    Public Health Foundation of India, 2011
    In India, the poor are not uniformly disadvantaged. Nutrition data from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS)-3 shows that malnutrition is particularly prevalent amongst the STs. Scs, other Backward Classes (OBC) and Muslims than other caste and religious groups.
  • Document

    Enhancing optimal infant feeding practices in India

    Public Health Foundation of India, 2011
    Appropriate Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) practices are critical to improving nutrition, child survival and development. Major killers of infants in India include neonatal infections, diarrhoea and pneumonia.

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