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  • Document

    Mobilising sustainable local government revenue in Ghana: modelling property rates and business taxes

    University of Technology, Sydney, 2015
    Property rates and business operating license fees constitute the major revenue sources for local government authorities. Accurate assessment of these revenues enhances the revenue base and effectiveness of their generation.
  • Document

    Constraints on property rating in the Offinso South Municipality of Ghana

    University of Technology, Sydney, 2013
    The potential of property rate has been least tapped by decentralized governments in Ghana. This paper investigates the property rating system in Ghana through a case study of Offinso South Municipality (OSM). Questionnaires were used to gather empirical data from property owners in the municipality.
  • Document

    Property taxation in developing countries

    Chr. Michelsen Institute, Norway, 2017
    Property tax (PT) raises on average revenues of less than 1% of GDP in developing countries. In many African countries it contributes far less than 0.5%. Following such low contribution, there is a growing eagerness among policy makers to increase its share in GDP.
  • Document

    Agricultural input subsidies for improving productivity, farm income, consumer welfare and wider growth in low- and lower-middle-income countries: a systematic review

    The Campbell Collaboration, 2018
    In recent decades, agricultural productivity in low- and lower-middle-income countries, particularly in Africa, has fallen increasingly behind that of upper middle-income countries. Adequate use of agricultural inputs such as improved seeds and inorganic fertilisers has been identified as one way of enhancing agricultural productivity.
  • Document

    How property tax would benefit Africa

    Africa Research Institute, 2015
    The developmental benefits of governments taxing citizens, even for modest sums, are often disregarded. African governments have long depended on revenue from natural resources or foreign aid to fund budgets.
  • Document

    Perspectives from the field: SDC cooperation for property taxation

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2017
    This paper reviews three projects implemented in the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation’s (SDC) Democratisation, Decentralisation and Local Governance Network (DDLGN) that aim to provide incentives for local governments to increase tax compliance and revenues.
  • Document

    Strengthening IT systems for property tax reform

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2017
    The introduction of improved IT systems has long been hailed as a powerful – potentially transformative – tool for strengthening local property taxes. Yet in practice this promise has rarely been achieved on a sustainable basis in Africa, despite significant investment.
  • Document

    Valuation for property tax purposes

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2017
    Improving processes for valuing properties lies at the heart of efforts to improve the overall effectiveness of property taxation. Effective property taxation is impossible without efficient property valuation. In practice, however, valuation rolls across most of Africa are incomplete and severely out-ofdate, thus dramatically reducing potential property tax yield.
  • Document

    Linking property tax revenue and public services

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2017
    n practical terms most property tax reforms are, first and foremost, efforts to increase tax revenue. But the ultimate goal of tax reform is, of course, broader: expanding tax revenue in order to finance the provision of valuable publicly-provided goods and services. Tax reform is only socially desirable if tax revenue is, in fact, translated into improved public outcomes.
  • Document

    Designing a property tax reform strategy for sub‐Saharan Africa: an analytical framework applied to Kenya

    Wiley Online Library, 2000
    Countries throughout Sub‐Saharan Africa are exploring options to improve local property taxation. Using the case of Kenya, this article provides an analytical framework for designing an effective property tax reform strategy.

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