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Searching with a thematic focus on Participation, Governance

Showing 21-30 of 713 results

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  • Document

    Does less engaged mean less empowered? Political participation lags among African youth, especially women

    Afrobarometer, 2016
    The African Union (AU) Assembly declared 2009 - 2018 the "African Youth Decade" and released an action plan to promote youth empowerment and development throughout the continent, including by raising young citizens' representation and participation in political processes. 
  • Document

    The effect of exposure to political institutions and economic events on demand for democracy in Africa

    Afrobarometer, 2015
    Understanding why people demand democracy is important to an evaluation of the prospects for democratic stability. Most researchers examining this question have added national-level variables to multi-level regression models of survey data.
  • Document

    Do citizens reward good service? Voter responses to basic service provision in southern Africa

    Afrobarometer, 2015
    Theories of democratic governance posit that citizens should reward politicians for good service and punish them for bad. But does electoral accountability work as theorised, especially in developing country contexts?
  • Document

    Language, education, and citizenship in Africa

    Afrobarometer, 2016
    African states are known for their linguistic diversity. Few have spread a single official language widely through their education systems. The preservation of many local languages seems a benefit in terms of minority rights, but some fear that fragmentation may inhibit national cohesion and democratic participation.
  • Document

    Whose public spaces? Citizen participation in urban planning in Santiago, Chile

    International Institute for Environment and Development, 2013
    This article describes how community action stopped two planning proposals to build in public spaces in Las Condes, a commune in the metropolitan area of Santiago in Chile. The first proposal was the construction of a shopping mall by a private owner and the second a municipal proposal by the city council to build an enclosure around a public park.
  • Document

    Spotlight on publications: budgets and human rights

    Evidence and Lessons from Latin America, 2011
    By ratifying human rights treaties, States assume obligations and duties under international law to respect, protect and fulfil human rights. But these obligations will do nothing if governments do not allocate public funds to the realisation of those human rights.
  • Document

    Spotlight on publications: citizen participation in local governance in Latin America

    Evidence and Lessons from Latin America, 2012
    Citizen participation in governance at the local level has long been acknowledged to play a role in improving public policies. It is seen as enhancing policies’ responsiveness to the population’s needs and their quality, as citizens make creative and innovative proposals to solve development challenges.
  • Document

    Spotlight on publications: design, adoption and implementation of Latin American Freedom of Information Acts

    Evidence and Lessons from Latin America, 2012
    In the last two decades, Latin American countries – from Brazil, Chile and Colombia to Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru and Uruguay - have designed and adopted innovative Freedom of Information Acts (FOIAs).
  • Document

    Spotlight on publications: human rights in Latin America

    Evidence and Lessons from Latin America, 2013
    Strong national human rights institutions, an active regional human rights court, a human rights approach to budgeting and strategic litigation by civil society: these are just some of the innovative approaches Latin American countries are taking to improve human rights across the region.
  • Document

    Spotlight on publications: indigenous and ethnic minority rights

    Evidence and Lessons from Latin America, 2013
    Indigenous and ethnic minorities are recognised under international law as a collective group with a shared identify and specific rights that governments should protect and guarantee via national frameworks and innovative public policies.

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