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Searching with a thematic focus on Health systems

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  • Document

    The economic burden of malaria

    Commission on Macroeconomics and Health, WHO, 2001
    There is a strong link between malaria levels and a country’s economic growth, according to a research report from the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Macroeconomics and Health.The research used a number of mathematical models to correlate epidemiological data for malaria and data on national income, based on gross domestic product per capita, between 1965 and 1990.
  • Document

    Macroeconomics and health: investing in health for economic development

    Commission on Macroeconomics and Health, WHO, 2001
    Scaling up the resources spent in the health sector by poor countries and donors could help to avert up to 8 million deaths by 2010. This is the key message of the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health whose members have produced this report, published by the World Health Organization.
  • Document

    World Development Report 2002

    World Bank, 2001
    This World Development Report, from the World Bank, argues that effective institutions are critical to sustained and successful market reforms. It notes that market reforms have had a mixed record at prompting growth, increasing productivity and alleviating poverty in developing countries across the world. The report, therefore, asks two key questions.
  • Document

    Aid and public expenditure: a guide

    Centre for Aid and Public Expenditure, ODI, 2000
    Which way forward for development aid? Current practice tends towards a more comprehensive approach to funding. Will this be more effective than specific project aid? It could be, according to this study. The key to success is a thorough understanding of the budget process in developing countries.In recent years, poverty reduction has become the central objective of development co-operation.
  • Document

    Post-TRIPS options for access to patented medicines in developing countries

    Commission on Macroeconomics and Health, WHO, 2001
    Since developing countries spend a large percentage of their private household health expenditures on drugs, affordability of patented medicines is particularly important.
  • Document

    Why Health Care Information Systems Succeed or Fail

    Institute for Development Policy and Management, Manchester, 1999
    This document offers an understanding and model of why health care information systems succeed or fail, and with general guidance on how to avoid HCIS failure.Some health care information systems (HCIS) do succeed, but the majority are likely to fail in some way.
  • Document

    DAC guidelines on conflict, peace and development co-operation and DAC policy statement

    Development Assistance Committee, OECD, 1997
    All development cooperation strategies and programmes must help societies to manage tensions and disputes without resorting to violence. How can international donors best promote peace-building and post-conflict reconciliation?
  • Document

    Guidelines and Categories for Classifying Participatory Research Projects in Health Promotion

    Institute of Health Promotion Research, University of British Columbia, 1995
    This document, produced by the Institute of Health Research, Canada, outlines a set of guidelines for participatory research in health promotion.
  • Document

    Circumstance and choice : the role of initial conditions and policies in transition economies

    Policy Research Working Papers, World Bank, 1997
    This working paper, published by the World Bank, uses econometrics to examine the way that initial conditions, political factors, and reforms, affected economic growth performance in the transition economies of central and eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, China, and Vietnam.
  • Document

    Gender and health: a technical paper

    Women's Health and Development Programme, WHO, 1998
    Studies on health differences between men and women tend to emphasise biological factors as determinant. Instead, this technical paper, written by the Gender and Women’s Health Department at the World Health Organisation (WHO), explores the implications of the shift to a 'gender and development' (GAD) approach for the analysis of health and health care issues.

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