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  • Document

    Africa rising?: popular dissatisfaction with economic management despite a decade of growth

    Afrobarometer, 2013
    Many African individuals still experience regular shortages of basic necessities, and rates of “lived poverty” remain high. In this context, the current paper shows that across 34 countries, a majority (53%) rate the current condition of their national economy as “fairly” or “very bad”, while just 29% offer a positive assessment.
  • Document

    The partnership of free speech & good governance in Africa

    Afrobarometer, 2013
    Much of Africa has undergone a radical transformation in terms of the freedom to communicate in the last two decades, but despite the opening and expansion of media and technology, freedom of expression is still enjoyed unequally across Africa.
  • Document

    Governments falter in fight to curb corruption: the people give most a failing grade

    Afrobarometer, 2013
    Corruption punishes the poor the most. This paper underlines that poor Africans perceive higher levels of corruption in their state institutions and are more likely to pay a bribe in order to obtain official documents, gain access to public services or avoid a problem with the police.
  • Document

    What people want from government: basic services performance ratings, 34 countries

    Afrobarometer, 2013
    The current paper relies on an Afrobarometer survey that asked people in 34 African countries to rate the governmental performance in their countries regarding basic services. The paper shows that Africans hold largely negative views about their governments’ performance on key services such as delivery of water and maintaining sanitary conditions, as well as supplying electricity.
  • Document

    Africa’s willing taxpayers thwarted by opaque tax systems, corruption

    Afrobarometer, 2014
    Mobilisation of resources through taxation is a top priority on Africa's development agenda. The current paper reveal widespread citizen commitment in 29 sub-Saharan African countries to the principle of taxation and to taking responsibility – by paying their taxes – for national development.
  • Document

    Support for African women's equality rises: education, jobs & political participation still unequal

    Afrobarometer, 2014
    Across the globe, women and girls lack access to the levels of education, economic power and political leadership enjoyed by men. However, an Afrobarometer's survey of more than 50,000 people in 34 African countries shows broad support for women's equality among both men and women, and widespread acceptance of women’s leadership capabilities.
  • Document

    Demand for democracy is rising in Africa, but most political leaders fail to deliver

    Afrobarometer, 2014
    Africans express growing attachment to democracy. This Afrobarometer policy paper points to the gap in many African countries between popular demand for democracy and the supply of democracy actually delivered by ruling elites.
  • Document

    Ethnicity and individual attitudes towards international investors: survey evidence from sub-Saharan Africa

    Afrobarometer, 2013
    Academic literature supports the idea that FDI is conducive for growth and, more importantly, for poverty alleviation. This paper focuses on Sub-Saharan Africa and tests the determinants of individual support toward foreign investors. The paper proposes a model that explains why foreign direct investment reinforces policy making along ethnic cleavages.
  • Document

    Citizens’ attitudes towards taxation in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and South Africa

    Afrobarometer, 2013
    Little is known about tax compliance behaviour in developing countries. This study explores factors that determine citizens’ tax compliance attitude in four African countries: South Africa, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.
  • Document

    Social desirability bias and reported vote preferences in African surveys

    Afrobarometer, 2014
    There has been little investigation into whether reported African voter preferences are reliable, or whether they are affected by bias. The current paper uses a voting simulation experiment in Uganda and analysis of existing surveys from a number of African countries to show that African voters who are observed by others are less likely to report a preference for a co-ethnic candidate.

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