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Searching with a thematic focus on Aid and debt, Humanitarian and emergency assistance

Showing 41-50 of 555 results

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  • Document

    Sex and age matter - Improving humanitarian response in emergencies

    Feinstein International Center, USA, 2011
    To ensure that vulnerabilities, needs and access to life-saving services are best understood and responded to, humanitarian actors must collect information based on sex and age. When this data is lacking, it limits the effectiveness of humanitarian response in all phases of a crisis.
  • Organisation

    Belize Red Cross Society

    In the Caribbean, the national Red Cross societies are assisted by the International Federation Secretariat, with regional offices based in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago and the Dominican Republ
  • Document

    Assessing Progress on Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation in Development Processes

    Eldis Community, 2010
    This paper reviews the extent of convergence between disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) at a number of scales. It also examines what is at stake if the two agendas do not converge. The authors present updated evidence of where DRR and CCA are already converging and evaluate obstacles to further convergence.
  • Document

    Disaster Risk Reduction. A review of DRR work by DEC Member Agencies in response to the 2004 Tsunami

    Reliefweb, 2010
    This review report from the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) examines whether its vision of a more long-lasting impact had been achieved in terms of strengthening the 2004 Tsunami-affected population’s resilience to future environmental shocks and disasters in Sri Lanka, India and Indonesia. Its purpose is to inform future disaster responses by identifying lessons learnt.
  • Document

    On the edge: why older people’s needs are not being met in humanitarian emergencies

    HelpAge International, 2011
    When disaster strikes, older people are among the most vulnerable to neglect, injury, death and disease, yet their needs are often overlooked. This report sets out the scale and nature of this problem and makes recommendations for change.
  • Document

    Sex and age matter: improving humanitarian response in emergencies

    Feinstein International Center, USA, 2011
    Humanitarian aid is largely guided by anecdotes rather than evidence. Currently, the humanitarian system shows significant weaknesses in data collection, analysis and response in all stages of a crisis or emergency.  As a result, the present humanitarian system is much less evidence-driven than it should be and than it would like to be.
  • Document

    Humanitarian emergency response review

    Department for International Development, UK, 2011
    The scale, frequency and severity of rapid onset humanitarian disasters will continue to grow in the coming years, due to a number of factors - including rapid population growth, especially in disaster prone areas, and changes in sea levels, in global rainfall and stormpatterns. This Independent review of the UK Government's humanitarian response systems argues
  • Organisation

    Center for Rebuilding Sustainable Communities after Disasters

    The primary purpose of the Center for Rebuilding Sustainable Communities after Disasters (CRSCAD) is to work in close collaboration with practitioners, academics, researchers, policy makers and grassr
  • Document

    States of fragility: stabilisation and its implications for humanitarian action

    Overseas Development Institute [ES], 2010
    Stabilization includes a combination of military, humanitarian, political and economic activities to control, contain and manage areas affected by armed conflict and complex emergencies. This paper explores the evolution of international stabilization efforts and their significance for humanitarian action.
  • Document

    Helping South Asia cope better with natural disasters: the role of social protection

    Development Policy Review, 2007
    This article reviews major cash transfers to households as a mean of social protection in a number of Asian countries. Looking at Turkey, Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Pakistan in particular, the author indicates the role which the World Bank has played as a post-disaster donor in those countries, noticing the positive impact of this support on short-term food security and long-term recovery.

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