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Searching with a thematic focus on Gender

Showing 4221-4230 of 4250 results

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  • Document

    The effect of child work on school enrollment in Egypt

    Workshop on the Analysis of Poverty and its Determinants in the MENA Region, 2001
    Paper addresses two main research questions. First, to what extent does work (defined both traditionally and more broadly) reduce the school attendance of children in Egypt? The analysis shows that decisions regarding school and work participation are jointly determined and that work significantly reduces school attendance for girls.
  • Document

    Gender perspectives on disarmament and development

    United Nations [UN] Department for Disarmament Affairs, 2001
    This note explores two dimensions of the development/disarmament discussion. First, it looks at the macro issue of national disarmament, primarily related to nuclear weapons and military expenditures.
  • Document

    Gender perspectives on disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR)

    United Nations [UN] Department for Disarmament Affairs, 2001
    Paper presents general trends of armed conflict, including: that men may have been more active in organised fighting, while women may have had to flee to refugee camps, been subjected to violence, had to assume non-traditional responsibilities and seen their domestic responsibilities intensified in their efforts to secure food, shelter and security for their families.
  • Document

    Gender perspectives on small arms

    United Nations [UN] Department for Disarmament Affairs, 2001
    Paper assesses relevant issues for those working on small arms in conflict situations, including:women and men (girls and boys) often participate in armed conflict in different wayswomen and men often have different perceptions of "securitythere is often inequality in representation of women and men in peace and reconstructionGender perspectives are also important to co
  • Document

    Integrating gender into environmental research and policy

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 1996
    The purpose of this paper is to show why gender issues are important in local natural resource management; to examine in what ways and with what effects environmental policies and programmes have attempted to incorporate concerns for women in the past; and to suggest how the situation can be improved in future.This introductory chapter discusses the importance of including the social dimension,
  • Document

    Gender, HIV/AIDS transmission and impacts: a review of issues and evidence

    BRIDGE, 1998
    Reviews statistical data on gender specific effects of AIDS, and argues that gender analysis is central to a comprehensive understanding of HIV/AIDS transmission, because of its immediate relevance to sexual behaviour, which is the variable most directly affecting HIV/AIDS transmission.Makes recommendations about ways to improve data collection and analysis form a gender perspective:To
  • Document

    Supply responses of West African agricultural households: implications of intrahousehold preference heterogeneity

    International Food Policy Research Institute, 1999
    Paper illustrates how an intrahousehold approach can contribute to a better understanding of microeconomic allocation decisions and policy impacts.
  • Document

    Gender in the World Bank's poverty assessments: six case studies from Sub-Saharan Africa

    United Nations [UN] Research Institute for Social Development, 1999
    Looks at six Poverty Asssesments (PAs) conducted by World Bank teams and the way in which gender issues are treated in them (in Ghana, Zambia, Tanzania and Uganda).
  • Document

    Fertility preferences and behaviour: a case study of two villages in the Punjab, Pakistan

    Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Pakistan, 1999
    Demand for high number of children is believed to be a major reason for high fertility levels in Pakistan.
  • Document

    Multi-sectoral support of basic and girls' education

    US Agency for International Development, 2000
    The study provides an overview of how and to what extent the religious, business and media sectors have supported girls' education in developing countries in order to understand their role in and potential for supporting girls' education activities. It categorises sector activities into three areas: policy advocacy, opinion-making and service provision.

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