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  • Document

    Rural livelihood diversity in developing countries: evidence and policy implications

    Natural Resource Perspectives, ODI, 1999
    Examines livelihood diversification as a survival strategy of rural households in developing countries. Although still of central importance, farming on its own is increasingly unable to provide a sufficient means of survival in rural areas.
  • Document

    Sustainable Livelihoods and Project Design in India

    Overseas Development Institute, 2000
    Reviews the design of two new DFID projects in Orissa and Andhra Pradesh, India. The projects aim to contribute to the Government of India’s efforts to eliminate poverty through support to its watershed development programme. The design of the two projects ran parallel to the development of the Sustainable Livelihoods (SL) approach and framework.
  • Document

    Developing methodologies for livelihood impact assessment: experience of the African Wildlife Foundation in East Africa

    Overseas Development Institute, 2000
    Describes how key concepts of the Sustainable Livelihoods (SL) approach were incorporated into methods for assessing the impact of wildlife projects in East Africa. It shows that the SL approach can be applied not only to planning new projects, but also to the review of existing ones - even where these were not planned with SL concepts in mind.
  • Document

    Key sheets for sustainable livelihoods

    Department for International Development, UK, 1998
    Aim of this series to provide a reference point for DFID decision-making about various aspects of service delivery and resource management. The series will also analyse different aspects of the policy process and options for donor intervention. Issues covered are:
  • Document

    Towards a Technology Strategy for Sustainable Livelihoods

    Sustainable Livelihoods Programme, UNDP, 1999
    Outlines means for appropriate technology promotion within a sustainable livlihoods planning framework.
  • Document

    Institutional support for sustainable livelihoods in Southern Africa: final report

    Khanya - Managing Rural Change CC, 2000
    This article focuses on critical issues in managing change for SRLs (Sustainable Rural Livelihoods).Chief features of SRL approach:It starts with (poor) people as the focus, and so puts clients at the centreIt recognises the differences within rural communitiesIt recognises the holistic nature of people's livesIt builds on positivesIt emphasises that rural people
  • Document

    Aquaculture, poverty impacts and livelihoods

    Natural Resource Perspectives, ODI, 2000
    Aquaculture is often viewed narrowly as intensive culture of salmon and shrimp to provide high value products for luxury markets and is often associated with environmental degradation. The promotion of aquaculture for rural development has had a poor record in many developing countries, especially in Africa.
  • Document

    Ethical trade and sustainable rural livelihoods: Volta River Estates Fairtrade bananas case study

    Natural Resources Institute, UK, 2001
    Uses Volta River Estates Ltd. (Ghana) as a case study into ethical trade and sustainable rural livelihoods. This organisation is a Fairtrade banana exporter.The VREL example suggests that plantations can increase livelihood opportunities for certain groups of people without negatively affecting the natural resource base.
  • Document

    Extension, poverty and vulnerability: inception report of a study for the Neuchatel Initiative

    Department for International Development, UK, 2001
    This inception paper reviews recent trends in poverty, vulnerability and extension, and the policy context in which extension is located. The paper concludes that:
  • Document

    Non-farm rural livelihoods

    Natural Resources Institute, UK, 2000
    Paper suggests that poor rural people seek livelihoods in the non-farm sector: (a) to complement seasonal agricultural incomes; (b) to supplement inadequate (or absent) agricultural incomes; and (c) to take advantage of opportunities arising in the non-farm sector.

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