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  • Document

    Understanding rangeland biodiversity

    Overseas Development Institute, 1999
    Rangelands are geographical regions dominated by grass and grass-like species with or without scattered woody plants, occupying between 18-23% of world land area excluding Antarctica.
  • Document

    The policy process: an overview

    Overseas Development Institute, 1999
    Review identifies key concepts for the description of the policy making process, and identifies a 21 point check-list of the events most likely to make policy-decisions happen.The key argument of the paper is that a ‘linear model’ of policy-making, characterised by objective analysis of options and separation of policy from implementation, is inadequate.
  • Document

    Information and Power: Implications for Process Monitoring: A Review of the Literature

    Overseas Development Institute, 1999
    Process documentation and monitoring (PDR) raises a number of controversial issues relating to how the interaction between power, information generation and knowledge is manifested. PDR relies for its success on a willingness to put sometimes sensitive information in the public domain.
  • Document

    IFPRI and the abolition of the wheat flour ration shops in Pakistan: a case-study on policymaking and the use and impact of research

    International Food Policy Research Institute, 1998
    Assesses the impact of research on the decision to abolish a long-term corrupt system of wheat rationing in Pakistan.Lessons learned include:"Useful " research exhibits certain key characteristics: research dealt with a high priority issue; research conformed to policymakers' expectations; research findings were consistent with previous research; research provided needed quantitative
  • Document

    Measuring the benefits of social science research

    International Food Policy Research Institute, 1998
    Addresses two questions. The first is “What are the benefits of social science research?”; the second is “How should they be measured?” The response to the first is that, as with research in the physical sciences, the benefits should be identified in terms of changes in economic surplus for different groups.
  • Document

    Proposal for measuring the benefits of policy-oriented social science research

    International Food Policy Research Institute, 1998
    Addresses the problem of how to measure the benefits of policy-oriented social science research. It argues that social science research promotes economic efficiency in three different ways—it fosters efficiency in the public sector both directly and through effects on the general public, and it increases the efficiency of the private sector.
  • Document

    Some useful methods of measuring the benefits of social science research

    International Food Policy Research Institute, 1998
    What are the “returns” to policy-oriented research in the social sciences? One presumes that the positive net benefits to society, or at least a certain segment of society, would be treated as returns, but how does one determine what these benefits are?
  • Document

    The value of economic research

    International Food Policy Research Institute, 1999
    Discussion of method and models for evaluating impacts of economic researchEconomic research generates a wide array of benefits. These include information, technological change, and improved policy. There are few quantitative studies of the benefits of economic research, and some benefits may be misattributed to biological and physical research.
  • Document

    Assessing the Impact of Rice Policy Changes in Viet Nam and the Contribution of Policy Research

    International Food Policy Research Institute, 1999
    Analysis of the economic impact of IFPRI research on the rice policy and marketing in Vietnam between 1995-1997.The research is described, and the conclusions and recommendations that emerged are discussed in the context of the decisionmaking processes in Viet Nam.
  • Document

    Returns to Policy-Related Social Science Research in Agriculture

    International Food Policy Research Institute, 1999
    Policy research is valuable as a source of information for decisionmakers. The value of research is the expected social gain from policy decisions influenced by the information generated. The gain from a decision depends on choosing the best policy given the state of the world, which is uncertain. The output of policy research is a conclusion about that state.

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