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Searching with a thematic focus on Aid and debt, Humanitarian and emergency assistance

Showing 61-70 of 555 results

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  • Document

    Towards good humanitarian government: the role of the affected state in disaster response

    Humanitarian Policy Group, ODI, 2009
    This brief asserts that research relating to humanitarian crises has largely focused on what international aid agencies and donor governments do in response to disasters. Much less attention has been given to, the author states, analysis of the role of the affected state in responding to the needs of its own
  • Document

    The IASC gender handbook for humanitarian action: women, girls, boys and men - different needs and equal opportunities

    United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, 2006
    In the rush to provide humanitarian response when a disaster hits or a conflict erupts, paying specific attention to gender issues may seem irrelevant.
  • Document

    The Red Cross and Red Crescent climate guide

    Red Cross/ Red Crescent Centre on Climate Change and Disaster Preparedness, 2007
    The Red Cross / Red Crescent Climate Guide puts forward experiences of more than forty National Societies who in the last five years have started to address climate change in their work. The guide aims to provide guidance and step-by-step approaches on how to address climate risks.
  • Document

    The Right to Survive: The humanitarian challenge in the twenty-first century

    Oxfam, 2009
    Almost 250 million people around the world are affected by climate-related disasters in a typical year. This report projects that, by 2015, this number could grow by 50 per cent to an average of more than 375 million people as climate change and environmental mismanagement create a proliferation of droughts, floods, and other disasters.
  • Document

    A ripple in development?: long term perspectives on the response to the Indian Ocean tsunami 2004

    Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation - NORAD, 2009
    This evaluation explores how to turn the ripple of the global response to 2004 tsunami into a developmental wave greater than that of the tsunami. The evaluation covers five sets of issues: the roles of the states and civil society, livelihoods and poverty, social relations, disaster risk mitigation, and capacity building. Some notable findings of the evaluation are:
  • Document

    The role of the affected state in humanitarian action: A case study on India

    Humanitarian Policy Group, ODI, 2009
    India is one of the largest and most vulnerable countries, in terms of exposure to natural hazards including floods, cyclones, earthquakes, tsunamis or droughts. Reported direct losses from natural catastrophes more than quadrupled from 1981-1995, reaching $13.4bn, as compared to the losses registered during the previous 15 years ($2.9bn). This alarming trend is accelerating. 
  • Document

    World Disasters Report 2009 - focus on early warning, early action

    International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, 2009
    This report focuses on two key aspects of disaster risk reduction: early warning and early action. The author states that the decline in injuries, loss of livelihoods and deaths from disasters over the past 30 years is, in part, due to the establishment and improvement of early warning systems.
  • Document

    Real-time evaluations of humanitarian action

    Active Learning Network for Accountability and Performance in Humanitarian Action, 2009
    Real-time evaluations (RTE) is one of the most demanding types of evaluation practice. It requires wide range of skills from evaluators but also a tightly focused professional approach in order to meet the demands of an RTE.
  • Document

    Resource manual on flash flood risk management module 2: non-structural measures

    International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, (ICIMOD), Nepal, 2008
    Frequent flash floods in the Hindu-Kush Himalayan region pose a severe threat to life, livelihoods and infrastructure, both within the mountains and downstream. They tend to carry with them much higher amounts of debris which can cause damage to hydropower stations, roads, bridges, buildings and other infrastructure.
  • Document

    Resource manual on flash flood risk management module 1: community-based management

    International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, (ICIMOD), Nepal, 2008
    Frequent flash floods in the Hindu-Kush Himalayan region pose a severe threat to life, livelihoods and infrastructure, both within the mountains and downstream. Vulnerable groups, including people with disabilities, the poor, women and children, are the worst hit. This manual aims to help communities build their capacity to manage flash floods and other disaster risks themselves.

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