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Searching with a thematic focus on Gender work and employment, Gender

Showing 61-70 of 278 results

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  • Document

    Promoting women`s participation in the APEC economies: some recommendations

    2015
    Increasing women`s economic participation is not yet universally accepted despite three decades of global advocacy; and women empowerment and gender equality are still a work in progress. A mechanism that can be tapped to promote women`s economic participation is the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).
  • Document

    Increasing economic opportunities of women in the APEC

    Philippine Institute for Development Studies, 2015
    This study seeks to review the APEC regional agenda of increasing economic
  • Document

    Labor policy analysis for jobs expansion and development

    Philippine Institute for Development Studies, 2014
    The Philippines is at a crossroad. It can choose to continue to follow current unrealistic policies that despite good intentions have been shown to be actually detrimental to the poor. Or, it can elect to try another development path to get a better chance at reducing poverty.
  • Document

    Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti and the Women's Union of Abeokuta

    Unesbib, 2014
    As part of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation’s (UNESCO) long-running General History of Africa project, the UNESCO Women in Africa Series aims to highlight a selection of key women figures in African history through the use of information and communication technologies.
  • Document

    ICT and employment promotion among poor women: how can we make it happen? Some reflections on Kerala's experience

    Centre for Development Studies, Kerala, India, 2008
    This paper deals with the integration of gender in policies relating to information and communication technology to empower socially excluded poor women as producers of this technology. In this context, this paper examines an interventionist ICT policy undertaken by Kudumbasree (an innovative women based participatory programme)
  • Document

    Democratising trade politics in the Americas: insights from the women's, environmental and labour movements

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2009
    This paper explores the extent to which and the ways in which civil society groups are contributing to the democratisation of trade policy and politics in the Americas. It explores the strategies adopted by a range of NGOs and social movements to influence the decision-making processes and the content of the trade agenda.
  • Document

    Overseas recruitment in India: structures, practices and remedies

    Centre for Development Studies, Kerala, India, 2010
    The increasing number of emigrants from India for employment over years has resulted in intense transnational transfer of funds in favour of the country.1 The inward flow of remittances to India had been increasing steadily from the 1970s.
  • Document

    The impact of gender and business training for female microfinance clients in Vietnam

    International Initiative for Impact Evaluation, 2015
    Business training leads to an increase in business knowledge, improvements in business practices, operations and sales, as well as income and assets for male microfinance clients. Moreover, business failure is lower for males who receive business training. Although business knowledge of women increases either, women do not put their knowledge into practice.
  • Document

    Vocational education in Kenya - a randomized evaluation

    International Initiative for Impact Evaluation, 2015
    Despite the importance of youth unemployment, little is known about how best to facilitate the transition of youth from school to the labor market in less developed countries, or how to provide marketable skills for youth not on the academic schooling track. Vocational education provides a promising opportunity for addressing the problem.
  • Document

    Gender equality in Burundi: Why does support not extend to women's right to inherit land?

    Afrobarometer, 2015
    With 27,834 km² of surface area and a population of 10.5 million, Burundi’s population density is seven times that of Tanzania and second only to Rwanda’s on the African mainland (World Bank, 2014). Its population grows at an annual rate of 2.4%, and more than 90% of the population lives primarily on agriculture.

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