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Searching with a thematic focus on Business and Private sector, Rising powers in international development, Regional Trade, Trade Policy in Brazil, China, India, South Africa

Showing 1-10 of 10 results

  • Document

    Trade in high technology products trends and policy imperatives for BRICS

    Research and Information System for Developing Countries, 2017
    The rise and relevance of BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) cannot be overstated. BRICS constitutes  the  most  prominent  emerging economies with substantial influence on world affairs – both political and economic.
  • Document

    BRICS: a global trade power in a multi-polar world

    Transnational Institute, 2014
    Central to the narrative of emerging powers, and particularly the BRICS, is the issue of trade, as both the driver of their economic surge, the factor behind their growing economies and the platform it has given them to assert influence in global governance.
  • Document

    Development Banks from the BRICS

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2015
    The BRIC acronym was created at the beginning of the 2000s to represent a group of four fast-growing economies –Brazil, Russia, India and China – and was changed to BRICS in December 2010 with the inclusion of South Africa.
  • Document

    South Africa, Africa, and the BRICS: progress, problems, and prospects: policy brief

    Centre for Conflict Resolution, University of Cape Town (UCT), 2014
    The Centre for Conflict Resolution (CCR), Cape Town, South Africa, hosted a two-day policy advisory group seminar in Tshwane (Pretoria), South Africa, 2014.
  • Document

    South Africa and the BRICS: progress, problems, and prospects

    Centre for Conflict Resolution, University of Cape Town (UCT), 2014
    The BRICS countries played a pivotal role in enabling other developing and emerging economies to weather the impact of the global financial crisis of 2008–2009. Participation in the BRICS grouping offers an opportunity for South Africa to deepen and broaden its bilateral engagement with Brazil, Russia, India, and China.
  • Document

    Nigeria and the BRICS: current and potential trade relations and their Implications for the Nigerian economy

    South African Institute of International Affairs, 2014
    The BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) countries have played a progressive role in global economic and political affairs since their recognition as global centres of growth. Based on their similar growth trajectories, these countries have the potential to reshape global economic governance in the near future.
  • Document

    South Africa in BRICS: a bilateral trade analysis

    South African Institute of International Affairs, 2014
    South Africa’s rich endowment of mineral and natural resources complements Brazil’s specialisation in agriculture and raw materials, Russia’s position as a major player in the commodity market, India’s services-exporting economy, and China’s recognition as the ‘world’s factory’.
  • Document

    Intra - BRICS trade & its implications for India

    2014
    The significance of international trade was highlighted by the leaders of the BRICS group of countries as they met for their Sixth Summit in Fortaleza, Brazil in July, 2014. The BRICS group, made up of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, came together calling for an Action Plan for advancing its work on trade and investment.
  • Document

    The BRICS fallacy

    Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2013
    Focus on the BRICS began in 2001. Back then, the group only included Brazil, Russia, India, and China (South Africa was added in 2010). It all started with a November 2001 Goldman Sachs research paper titled ‘‘Building Better Global Economic BRICs,’’ written by Jim O’Neill.
  • Document

    The economic engagement footprint of rising powers in sub-Saharan Africa: an analysis of trade, foreign direct investment and aid flows

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2013
    Rising powers such as Brazil, China, India, South Africa, the Gulf states or Turkey have entered the development arena through their expanding relationships with low-income countries (LICs) . A widespread perception is that these countries are establishing new forms of engagement, mainly under a South–South cooperation framework.