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Searching with a thematic focus on Crop production seeds and fertilizers, Agriculture and food

Showing 1-10 of 308 results

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  • Document

    Adoption of soil fertility management technologies in Malawi: Impact of drought exposure

    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 2017
    Soil fertility management (SFM) technologies may potentially protect against climate risks, reduce nutrient depletion and enhance food security. In this paper, we study impact of drought exposure on adoption and adoption intensity of SFM technologies, specifically, focusing on maize-legume intercropping and organic manure.
  • Document

    Probability weighting and input use intensity in a state-contingent framework

    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 2017
    Climate risk represents an increasing threat to poor and vulnerable farmers in drought-prone areas of Africa. This study assesses the fertilizer adoption responses of food insecure farmers in Malawi, where Drought Tolerant (DT) maize was recently introduced. A field experiment, eliciting risk attitudes of farmers, is combined with a detailed farm household survey.
  • Document

    Adoption of drought tolerant maize varieties under rainfall stress in Malawi

    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 2017
    This paper examines adoption of drought tolerant (DT) maize varieties under rainfall stress in Malawi using a Mundlak-Chamberlain panel Probit model with a Control Function approach. DT maize varieties is a promising technology that has the capacity to help smallholder farmers adapt to drought risks.
  • Document

    From Genebanks to Farmers. A study of approaches to introduce genebank material to farmers’ seed systems

    Noragric, Department of International Environment and Development Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 2017
    Genebanks conserve key resources for increasing global food security and adapting to environmental change. The conventional way genetic resources are deployed to farmers goes through a linear pathway of breeding, delivery and adoption (BDA) of improved varieties. However, over the past 30 years a number of other pathways from genebanks to farmers’ fields have been tested and operationalized.
  • Document

    The Future of rice security under climate change

    Centre For Non-Traditional Security Studies, 2016
    Food systems are climate and weather dependent; heat stress and changes in rainfall patterns and relative humidity are likely to regulate crop yields. Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) are likely to directly and indirectly bring new challenges to the stability and sustainability of global food production including rice.
  • Document

    Invasive plants and food security in Africa:the potential of Earth Observation Data

    South African Institute of International Affairs, 2017
    The spread of invasive plant species has serious consequences for Africa. Toxic weeds and harmful shrubs significantly shrink rangelands and lower the productivity of major grain foods such as maize (in some instances by up to 45%). Toxic weeds suppress the growth of staple crops and take over fields that could otherwise be used for agriculture.
  • Document

    Crops, crop pests and climate change - why Africa needs to be better prepared

    Climate Change Agriculture Food Security, 2015
    Ongoing investments in agriculture will not deliver for Africa until the destabilising nature of crop pest events, especially shock outbreak events, are addressed. As a result of climate change, the prevalence of crop pests will change and the frequency of shock pest events will increase, putting agricultural systems at risk.
  • Document

    India-Africa seed sector collaboration: emerging prospects and challenges

    Research and Information System for Developing Countries, 2016
    India-Africa seed sector has promises for improving trade with various African nations.
  • Document

    Environmental characterisation to guide breeding decisions in a changing climate

    Climate Change Agriculture Food Security, 2015
    Agriculture faces and will continue to face multiple challenges. Most notably, the need to meet food demand for a rapidly growing and urbanising population under increasingly variable and warmer climates.
  • Document

    Gender dimensions on farmers’ preferences for direct-seeded rice with drum seeder in India

    Climate Change Agriculture Food Security, 2016
    Transplanting is the dominant mode of rice establishment in India. Transplanted rice requires more labour and water and emits more greenhouse gases into the environment than DSR. In the past, DSR was mainly practiced in areas with low population density and where low or uncertain water availability prevented intensification of rice systems.

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