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Searching with a thematic focus on Norway, Marine Norway, Environment

Showing 1-10 of 18 results

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  • Document

    The RV Dr Fridtjof Nansen in the Western Indian Ocean: voyages of marine research and capacity development

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2017
    The marine research vessel (RV) Dr Fridtjof Nansen is a familiar visitor to the coastal waters of developing countries around the world. Since its first expedition in 1975, to survey fish abundance in an upwelling region of the Western Indian Ocean, the Nansen has returned to this “least known” of the world’s oceans numerous times.
  • Document

    The place of the oceans in Nor way’s foreign and development policy. Meld. St. 22 (2016–2017). Report to the Storting (white paper)

    Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Norway, 2017
    This  is  the  first  time  a  Norwegian  government  has  presented  a  white  paper  on  the  place  of  the  seas  and  oceans  in  the  country’s  foreign  and  development  policy.  Its  aim  is  to  highlight  the  opport
  • Document

    International law and sea-level rise: forced migration and human rights

    Fridtjof Nansen Institute, 2016
    This report provides a general overview of the international law issues relating to sea-level rise, (forced) migration and human rights. The first part provides a brief accounting of 'What We Know and What We Can Expect', discussing sea-level rise and its impacts, and then, in turn, their relationship and interaction with the criteria of statehood, human rights and mobility.
  • Document

    Blue Carbon

    GRID Arendal, 2015
    If the world is to decisively deal with climate change, every source of emissions and every option for reducing these should be scientifically evaluated and brought to the international community’s attention.
  • Document

    United Nations World Ocean Assessment

    GRID Arendal, 2016
    The first World Ocean Assessment (WOA) is a report on the state of the planet’s oceans. It is the product of the first cycle of the Regular Process for global reporting and assessment of the state of the marine environment, including socio-economic aspects, which was established after the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development.
  • Document

    Marine ecosystem services and the Sustainable Development Goals

    GRID Arendal, 2016
    How do marine ecosystem services support the Sustainable Development Goals? Marine and coastal ecosystems are vital to life on Earth. These ecosystems provide many “services” to people including food, coastal protection, carbon sequestration, biodiversity, recreation, but also inspiration for art and science, cultural identity and a spiritual home.
  • Document

    The ocean and us: how healthy marine and coastal ecosystems support the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals

    GRID Arendal, 2015
    The ocean has been a cornerstone of human development throughout the history of civilization. People continue to come to the coasts to build some of the largest cities on the planet, with thriving economies, culture and communities. Ocean and coastal ecosystems provide us with resources and trade opportunities that greatly benefit human well-being.
  • Document

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems - a lifeboat for coral reefs?

    GRID Arendal, 2016
    The shallow coral reefs that we all know, are like the tip of an iceberg - they are the more visible part of an extensive coral ecosystem that reaches into depths far beyond where most people visit.  The invisible reefs, known as mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) are widespread and diverse, however they remain largely unexplored in most parts of the world.  With the global climate he
  • Document

    Marine Litter Vital Graphics | GRID-Arendal - Publications

    GRID Arendal, 2016
    Every year, the sum of humanity’s knowledge increases exponentially. And as we learn more, we also learn there is much we still don’t know. Plastic litter in our oceans is one area where we need to learn more, and we need to learn it quickly. That’s one of the main messages in Marine Litter Vital Graphics. Another important message is that we already know enough to take action.
  • Document

    Seeing through fishers' lenses: Exploring marine ecological changes within Mafia Island Merine Park, Tanzania

    SAGE, 2016
    nsights from traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) of the marine environment are difficult to integrate into conventional science knowledge (CSK) initiatives. Where TEK is integrated into CSK at all, it is usually either marginalized or restricted to CSK modes of interpretation, hence limiting its potential contribution to the understanding of social-ecological systems.

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