Engaging the private sector in green infrastructure development and financing: a pathway toward building urban climate resilience

Engaging the private sector in green infrastructure development and financing: a pathway toward building urban climate resilience

In 2050 it is expected that over 60 percent of the global population will live in urban areas, representing an increase of 2.5 billion people. The majority of this growth will be concentrated in cities across Africa and Asia, pushing service delivery systems to their brink. The introduction and integration of green infrastructure (GI) as a means to complement or replace traditional grey infrastructure is one way in which cities can create more adaptive systems and help their citizens thrive.
 
This report from the USAID funded Adaptation Thought Leadership and Assessments (ATLAS) project examines the many benefits of GI, including stormwater management, reduced heat impacts, increased biodiversity, and improved air and water quality that work together to improve a city’s overall resilience. The report captures the various types of GI, associated costs and benefits, mechanisms to engage the private sector in the promotion and integration of GI, and uses project case studies from Mexico, Sweden, China and the United States to illustrate many of the ways GI is already making an impact. The report also provides recommendations for improving the integration of GI in urban and peri-urban settings by (1) mainstreaming GI into planning processes and regulatory documents; (2) updating codes to include GI and enforce new regulations; (3) developing incentives structures; (4) communicating and demonstrating GI benefits; and (5) providing technical assistance and coordination for successful implementation.
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