Nike and global labour practices

Nike and global labour practices

There is growing prominence for labour and environmental issues at the top of Nike

This case study outlines Nike's experience in developing and implementing various labour practice initiatives in its footwear and apparel factories worldwide. Since the introduction of its first Code of Conduct in 1992, Nike has made considerable progress in developing policies, procedures and partnerships to improve working conditions in the factories where its products are manufactured. This study demonstrates that many challenges lie ahead.

The problematic relationship that Nike has with certain parts of international civil society remains a concern. The company continues to be seen rightly or wrongly as not doing enough to demonstrate its responsibility for human rights, labour rights and environmental sustainability. Nike's Code of Conduct still fails to make explicit support for the Universal Declaration on Human Rights and the core ILO conventions. With its new corporate responsibility mission and commitment to The Global Compact, however, Nike seems to be moving towards a more strategic and pro-active approach to global corporate citizenship. With two senior vice presidents now accountable for both operational and strategic aspects of corporate responsibility, there is evidence of growing prominence for labour and environmental issues at the top of the organisation. [author]