Capacity building material for the realization of farmers rights in Malawi: farmers' rights related to plant genetic resources for food and agriculture in Malawi

Capacity building material for the realization of farmers rights in Malawi: farmers' rights related to plant genetic resources for food and agriculture in Malawi

The capacity building material on Farmers’ Rights is framed within the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture.
The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, in force since 2004, is the only international legal binding instrument recognizing the past, present and future contributions of farmers in all regions of the world, particularly those in centres of origin and diversity, in conserving, improving and making available these resources. The Treaty recognizes that such contributions are the basis of Farmers’ Rights.
According to the International Treaty, Farmers’ Rights should be promoted at national and international levels, but the responsibility for their realization rests with national governments.
The Treaty establishes as measures to protect and promote Farmers’ Rights the following:
• protection of traditional knowledge relevant to plant genetic resources for food and agriculture;
• equitably participate in sharing benefits arising from the use of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture;
• participate in making decisions, at the national level, on matters related to the conservation and sustainable use of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture; and
• save, use, exchange and sell seeds and propagating material saved in farms.
This list is not exhaustive and governments could adopt additional measures to realize Farmers’ Rights at the national level. However, the Treaty recognizes that the implementation of the mentioned measures is fundamental to the realization of Farmers’ Rights.
The capacity building material on Farmers’ Rights offers useful mechanisms for advancing in the implementation of the International Treaty in Malawi, especially in the realization of Farmers’ Rights.

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