Expanding lessons from a randomised impact evaluation of cash and food transfers in Ecuador and Uganda

Expanding lessons from a randomised impact evaluation of cash and food transfers in Ecuador and Uganda

There is now substantial evidence that periodic cash transfers to poor households as a form of social protection, particularly when conditional on complementary investments in child schooling and health, can lead to substantial and sustained improvements in household welfare, household food security and child schooling. Similarly, food transfers can lead to substantial improvements in household food security and may have persistent effects on household expenditure and food consumption. However, there is very limited evidence directly comparing impacts of the two modalities in the same setting.

This study draws from a unique set of integrated social protection experiments conducted in two countries to compare the relative impacts of cash and food transfers on household behavior in side by side comparisons in starkly different contexts: Ecuador and Uganda.

The study addresses the following research questions:

  • How does social protection affect intrahousehold conflict and intimate partner violence (IPV) in Northern Ecuador?
  • What lessons can we learn from a mixed methods qualitative and quantitative investigation on the impact of cash and in-kind tranfers on intimate partner violence in Northern Ecuador?
  • How do cash and food transfers linked to early childhood development (ECD) centers affect child cognitive development in Uganda?

 

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