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Searching with a thematic focus on Nutrition, Gender work and employment, Gender

Showing 1-10 of 18 results

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  • Document

    Women’s agricultural work and nutrition in South Asia: From pathways to a cross-disciplinary, grounded analytical framework

    Food Policy, 2019
    This systematic review examines the impact of women’s work in agriculture on maternal and child nutrition in South Asia. Building on previous reviews supported under the Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia (LANSA) consortium, and recent published literature, it includes findings from new LANSA research.
  • Document

    Gendered time, seasonality and nutrition: insights from two Indian districts

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
    Relatively few studies explore the links between women’s work in agriculture and nutritional outcomes. Using time use data from two Indian districts, this paper seeks to fill this gap.
  • Document

    Women agricultural workers and nutrition in Pakistan

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
    Pakistan has high rates of child undernutrition (both stunting and wasting). The country’s agricultural sector is a source of livelihood for over 40 per cent of the workforce. The LANSA Evidence Review for Pakistan found that there had been steady feminisation of the agricultural workforce as men moved out of the sector and women remained. 
  • Document

    Agriculture, nutrition and gender in India

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2016
    The South Asian region has one of the highest rates of child and maternal undernutrition in the world. Undernutrition is widespread and persistent even in India despite its relatively strong economic performance and is particularly high in rural areas and among those in agriculture based livelihoods. 
  • Document

    Women in agriculture and nutrition in Odisha, India

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
    The Odisha State Policy for Girls and Women (2014) is a comprehensive document that seeks to create a state where girls and women are equal partners in development.
  • Document

    Women’s agricultural work and nutrition in South Asia: policy priorities

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
    LANSA research has highlighted the linkage between women’s agricultural work and nutrition in South Asia. Official statistics acknowledge that agriculture accounts for a majority of women workers in these countries. Many women who work in agriculture, however, are not counted, and many others’ work is under-counted and often uncompensated.
  • Document

    Women in agriculture and nutrition in India

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2016
    Policy debates around agriculture and nutrition and the crucial role of women needs to be informed by evidence that research programmes like LANSA generate. The available evidence recommends the recognition of women’s roles in agriculture and nutrition.
  • Document

    Child Under-weight and Agricultural Productivity in India: Implications for Public Provisioning and Women’s Agency

    Review of Radical Political Economics, 2015
    The well-known pathways that link agriculture to child nutrition are food, quality of food, and care of feeding. Further, agricultural productivity growth contributes significantly to poverty reduction and reduction in child undernutrition.
  • Document

    Women, gender and the informal economy: An assessment of ILO research and suggested ways forward

    International Labour Organization, 2008
    This discussion paper provides an overview of the International Labour Organisation's (ILO) research on women, gender and the informal economy which was undertaken during the last two decades. It examines methodological and analytical frameworks used in various studies, identifies research gaps and proposes directions for future work.
  • Document

    The motherhood pay gap: A review of the issues, theory and international evidence

    International Labour Organization, 2015
    Evidence that mothers suffer a wage penalty over and above the penalty for being a woman raises concerns not only for gender equality but also for the capacity of societies to manage a sustainable balance between their economic aims of active female participation in paid work and the social aims of providing a fair distribution of income to support the reproduction and rearing of children.

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