Search

Reset

Searching with a thematic focus on Energy, Environment, Water in climate change, Climate change

Showing 1-5 of 5 results

  • Document

    Parched power: water demands, risks, and opportunities for India’s power sector

    World Resources Institute, Washington DC, 2018
    This paper aims to help decision-makers understand the magnitude of water issues for the thermal power sector in India with quantitative evidence. There is a significant data gap in power plant water use in India.
  • Document

    Making governance work for water-energy-food nexus approaches

    Climate and Development Knowledge Network, 2017
    This new working paper by Andrew Scott of ODI explores the effectiveness of governing for the “water-energy-food nexus” of issues. The author looks at approaches that understand the links between sectors, recognise these in decision-making and promote integrated policy-making.
  • Document

    The Water-Energy-Food Nexus: A new approach in support of food security and sustainable agriculture

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2014
    This FAO note gives a brief introduction to the Water-Energy-Food (WEF) Nexus conceptual framework as a useful way to describe and address the complex and interrelated nature of our global resource systems. It puts forward WEF as a conceptual approach:
  • Document

    Water for electricity: resource scarcity, climate change and business in a finite world

    Stockholm Environment Institute, 2012
    This report examines the potential impact of low carbon electricity generation technologies on water resources and how these water considerations might shape renewable generation choices. The report argues that water requirements for power generation depend on generation technology, type of cooling technology used in thermoelectric power generation and electricity demand itself.
  • Document

    The vulnerability of energy infrastructure to environmental change

    Chatham House [Royal Institute of International Affairs], UK, 2009
    Energy generation, extraction, refining, processing and distribution require a multifaceted global infrastructure. However, much of that infrastructure lies in areas that may become increasingly physically unstable owing to changes in the environment. Of particular concern are disruptions caused or exacerbated by climate change.