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Searching with a thematic focus on Food security, Nutrition

Showing 1-10 of 151 results

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  • Document

    Evidence-based policymaking in the food–health nexus

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2019
    This article examines the role of evidence in influencing food and nutrition-related public health policy, and starts to chart a way through the political economy of knowledge and evidence within this nexus.
  • Document

    Transforming food systems: The potential of engaged political economy

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2019
    A food systems approach is critical to understanding and facilitating food system transformation, yet gaps in analysis are impeding changes towards greater equity, sustainability, and emancipation. Gaps include analyses of interdependencies among food system activities, of narrative politics, and of the behaviour of food system components using dynamic methodologies.
  • Document

    Power in the Zambian nutrition policy process

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2019
    This article presents an example of a power analysis in the nutrition policy process in Zambia, using the ‘power cube’ framework. Here, nutrition policy priorities were found to have been shaped by a global epistemic community relying on the hidden and invisible power of technical language and knowledge to frame policy options which resonated with their own beliefs about malnutrition.
  • Document

    Building a sustainable food city: A collective approach

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2019
    Brighton – a city on the south coast of the UK with a vibrant food scene but also home to some entrenched inequalities – presents an excellent local case from which to explore some of the wider issues considered in this IDS Bulletin on the political economy of food.
  • Document

    Agroecology and food sovereignty

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2019
    The authors propose that agroecology provides a framework for understanding ‘levels’ for the transition to sustainable food systems. If we agree that agroecology includes social and political dimensions of governing territorial food systems, then it must be linked to movements for food sovereignty.
  • Document

    Envisioning new horizons for the political economy of sustainable food systems

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2019
    This article considers how political economy can expand to contribute to the contemporary study of sustainable food systems, raising new questions for researchers, practitioners, and social movement actors engaged in collaborative efforts to transform dominant foodscapes.
  • Document

    Reflections on IPES-Food: Can power analysis change the world?

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2019
    The major way in which IPES-Food seeks to achieve change is by preparing and widely disseminating reports on different aspects of the global food system, which are rigorous in both empirical and analytical terms. These reports are heavily critical of the productionist approach, demonstrating its negative impacts on the environment and human wellbeing.
  • Document

    The political economy approach to food systems reform

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2019
    The political economy approach to food systems steers away both from approaches that focus on biogeochemical flows and the embeddedness of food systems in the biosphere, and from classical economists’ approaches that address the role of prices in relating supply and demand.
  • Document

    Valuing different perspectives on power in the food system

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2019
    In this introductory article, we highlight debates that emerged in the IDS–IPES-Food workshop on the political economy of food as a way of introducing the articles that follow.
  • Document

    Would the people of Chhattisgarh prefer cash transfers instead of foodgrain?

    Sameeksha Trust, 2017
    The overwhelming and consistent preference for grain over cash is striking, especially since this preference was expressed by both men and women, irrespective of class, age, or community. It is useful to examine reasons for this sharp preference for grain over cash against the background of national debates about cash transfers.

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