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Searching with a thematic focus on Gender work and employment, Gender

Showing 1-10 of 281 results

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  • Document

    ESRC-DFID Research for Policy and Practice: Women, work and social protection

    Impact Initiative, 2019
    is collection of ESRC-DFID-funded research explores the need for a holistic approach to social protection moving beyond a framing of poverty alleviation as primarily being about access to the traditional labour market and cash transfers to encompass a broader range of considerations. Explores research from Bangladesh, Malawi, Lesotho, South Africa and Rwanda.
  • Document

    Women’s agricultural work and nutrition in South Asia: From pathways to a cross-disciplinary, grounded analytical framework

    Food Policy, 2019
    This systematic review examines the impact of women’s work in agriculture on maternal and child nutrition in South Asia. Building on previous reviews supported under the Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia (LANSA) consortium, and recent published literature, it includes findings from new LANSA research.
  • Document

    Automation, women, and the future of work

    Institute of Development Studies UK, 2017
    Will women benefit from the rapid automation and digitisation that is set to change the world of work as we know it? How can we ensure that women’s economic interests are brought into focus, and that debates on the future of work are not about the changing relationship between man and machine, but between people and machine?
  • Document

    Gendered time, seasonality and nutrition: insights from two Indian districts

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
    Relatively few studies explore the links between women’s work in agriculture and nutritional outcomes. Using time use data from two Indian districts, this paper seeks to fill this gap.
  • Document

    Women agricultural workers and nutrition in Pakistan

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
    Pakistan has high rates of child undernutrition (both stunting and wasting). The country’s agricultural sector is a source of livelihood for over 40 per cent of the workforce. The LANSA Evidence Review for Pakistan found that there had been steady feminisation of the agricultural workforce as men moved out of the sector and women remained. 
  • Document

    Agriculture, nutrition and gender in India

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2016
    The South Asian region has one of the highest rates of child and maternal undernutrition in the world. Undernutrition is widespread and persistent even in India despite its relatively strong economic performance and is particularly high in rural areas and among those in agriculture based livelihoods. 
  • Document

    Women in agriculture and nutrition in Odisha, India

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
    The Odisha State Policy for Girls and Women (2014) is a comprehensive document that seeks to create a state where girls and women are equal partners in development.
  • Document

    Women’s agricultural work and nutrition in South Asia: policy priorities

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
    LANSA research has highlighted the linkage between women’s agricultural work and nutrition in South Asia. Official statistics acknowledge that agriculture accounts for a majority of women workers in these countries. Many women who work in agriculture, however, are not counted, and many others’ work is under-counted and often uncompensated.
  • Document

    Women in agriculture and nutrition in India

    Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2016
    Policy debates around agriculture and nutrition and the crucial role of women needs to be informed by evidence that research programmes like LANSA generate. The available evidence recommends the recognition of women’s roles in agriculture and nutrition.
  • Document

    Making innovation work for girls and women in Tanzania

    Human Development Innovation Fund, 2017
    Women and girls typically experience the most extreme poverty because they face greater burdens of unpaid work, limited assets and productive resources compared to men, less access to education, and cultural factors that limit life-chances including early marriage.3 In addition, while there is a growing body of evidence showing that innovation has the power to transform women’s lives, there is

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